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Past operations

Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Botswana, Colombia, Cyprus, Eritrea, Jordan, Kashmir, Kosovo, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe



Afghanistan

The Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan recorded more than 10,000 casualties from remnants of conflict between April 2001 and March 2011. The vast majority of these were civilians.

MAG worked with staff from two Afghan demining non-governmental organisations (NGOs) – Organisation for Mine Clearance and Afghan Rehabilitation (OMAR) and Mine Detection Centre (MDC) from 2009 to 2010 and 2010 to 2011 respectively – to improve the capabilities of Afghan demining organisations by improving the safety of deminers, as well as their ability to efficiently and effectively clear land contaminated by mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO).

Mine action in Afghanistan is well-established, with Afghan demining NGOs playing a central role since the start and therefore developing significant capacities for operations. As such, MAG’s role was to provide high quality technical and organisational development support, bring our two decades’ experience of running large clearance operations in conflict zones, to these non-governmental organisations.

MAG’s operations in Afghanistan were suspended in June 2011 when funding for the project with MDC came to an end. However, MAG worked to gain operational accreditation during 2011 and is therefore placed to consider an operational presence, as well as other opportunities, should suitable funding arise.

Our thanks to the donors to MAG’s operations in Afghanistan: Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT).

See also:

MACCA website
OMAR website


Azerbaijan

From 1988 to 1994, the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan resulted in the displacement of tens of thousands of people. A moving front line resulted in mass destruction of housing and infrastructure. The national Agency for Rehabilitation and Reconstruction of Areas is responsible for repatriating Internally Displaced People and worked on reconstruction and rehabilitation work in regions affected by the war. The threat of landmine and unexploded ordnance contamination seriously hampered progress.

MAG supported Relief Azerbaijan, the national mine clearance NGO, coordinated by the Azerbaijan National Agency for Mine Action. From 2000, we helped to support these mine action resources under contract with the UN Office for Project Services.

In mid-March 2001, the teams began clearance that resulted in vital repairs being made to the national power line that runs 30 kilometres through the Fizuli region to the town of Horadiz. Areas needed to be cleared where the line passes through former defensive positions previously occupied by both the Armenian and Azerbaijan armies during the conflict.

In coordination with the construction company, areas around the existing pylons were cleared to make it safe to carry out the repair work, the result of which meant that inhabitants in the area once again had a more reliable supply of electricity.


Botswana

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website 


Colombia

Colombia has suffered more than 50 years of ongoing internal conflict, which has displaced at least 3.4 million people and resulted in widespread contamination by unexploded ordnance (UXO) and mines.

Around 60 per cent of Colombia’s municipalities remain contaminated and landmine use has resulted in a high number of victims – between 1990 and March 2012 an estimated 9,786 people were killed or maimed by mines.

MAG was operational in Colombia between 2009 and 2012. In August 2009, we began Community Liaison and Risk Education activities in the department of Antioquia, to assess the needs and priorities of local communities, and to alert communities to the dangers of mines and UXO, and risky behaviour to avoid.

This work was extended to 23 municipalities in Antioquia and Chocó in May 2010, and from November 2010 two Non-Technical Survey teams were trained and deployed to assess Suspected Hazardous Areas and better record information on the size and impact of contaminated areas. This process returns suspected contaminated land to communities and provides information to mine action stakeholders in order to assist with planning, coordination and prioritisation.

In 2011, MAG focused on the training of 30 bilingual indigenous teachers and leaders as facilitators to deliver Risk Education and carry out community risk-mapping. The project aimed to reduce the accident rate from Explosive Remnants of War contamination and facilitate the safe use of land for hunting, fishing, agricultural and social activities, thereby promoting the sustainable reconstruction of traditional ways of life in indigenous reserves.

Through our Community Liaison work, we have been able to establish trust with local communities, which is essential for the collection of data, particularly in a context where there has historically been a lack of confidence in outsiders; and more than 61,000 people in rural communities benefited from our work.

Our thanks to the donors to MAG’s operations in Colombia: Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Medico International and Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Cyprus

MAG was contracted by the United Nations from October 2004 to February 2010, to provide quality management on clearance of minefields between the Greek Cypriot- and Turkish Cypriot-controlled parts of the island.

Based in Nicosia, the project ensured that the clearance work undertaken by other UN contractors was done according to international standards in a safe and efficient manner.

Quality management is an integral part of all MAG’s operations and is laid out in each programme’s standard operating procedures and training, with the emphasis on quality and safety being built in to the implementation process, and direct monitoring of operations starting from the individual level.

The implementation of this project was mutually beneficial, as the team was able to implement methods and quality assurance principles from internal standards developed by the organisation in its range of programmes around the world.


Jordan

From January to May 2009, MAG supported the Jordanian National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation (NCDR), assisting them in developing their operational and managerial Quality Management capacity. MAG deployed one senior Quality Assurance/Quality Control specialist to:

• review the NCDR’s Quality Management system and Quality Assurance/Quality Control processes to identify operational and managerial challenges and areas for improvement;
• review National Technical Standards and Guidelines, plus the NCDR’s Quality Management Standard Operating Procedures, including how they are applied and managed in the field;
• create a capacity development programme for the Quality Management team and other relevant staff, involving formal lessons and other ‘classroom’ materials;
• provide on-the-job training related specifically to work being done in the Jordan Valley and Northern border;
• advise the NCDR on matters related to its national unexploded ordnance survey and  Standard Operating Procedures.

The aim of the project is to facilitate the effective, efficient and safe implementation of Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities throughout the NCDR and develop the capabilities of senior and operational staff enabling them to implement, monitor and improve the Quality Management system.


Kashmir

A number of conflicts between India and Pakistan over the last 50 years have left parts of the disputed mountain state of Kashmir contaminated with landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). This contamination is highly concentrated along the line of control. In September 2004, MAG formed a partnership with Islamic Relief, an international NGO promoting sustainable economic and social development with local communities.

The line of control follows the very narrow, steep valley of the river Nilum and separates Pakistaniand Indian-held Kashmir. Due to the geography in this region, erosion has taken place, especially during the rainy season. This has caused many of the landmines laid on the valley sides to be washed down to the bottom and they are now posing a threat to communities living on the valley floor.

As part of a Mine Risk Education (MRE) project, funded by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, MAG undertook an assessment mission in March 2005 to determine the extent of the landmine and UXO problem in the target areas of Neelam Valley, Lipa Valley and Bagh, information that was then used to train Islamic Relief field staff in MRE techniques.

From the data gathered in nine affected communities, it became clear that action needed to be taken to protect those threatened. To follow up, MAG carried out a four-week workshop for 20 Islamic Relief staff, enabling them to carry out MRE as part of an ongoing health and education programme.


Kosovo

MAG entered Kosovo almost immediately after the cessation of hostilities in June 1999, with a Mine Action Team from Cambodia deployed as an emergency response to the threat that landmines, cluster bombs and booby traps posed to the Kosovan population.

From a headquarters in Pristina, we recruited, trained and deployed three multi-skilled Mine Action Teams over the summer of 1999. The teams were based in the towns of Prizren, Podujevo and Mitrovica. They undertook various tasks, such as responding to emergency requests, house and school searches, clearance of Serbian Army minefields, marking of cluster bomb sites, and battle area clearance, particularly around the power lines.

Alongside the clearance activities, we developed a 'Child-to-Child' mine awareness project, where children are taught to become mine awareness teachers for their peers. The project proved extremely successful and was integrated into the school curriculum.

During the winter of 1999, MAG was requested to take over tasks suspended by other agencies due to their temporary withdrawal from Kosovo. Many of these tasks involved checking minefield fences and signs before the snow began to cover markings.

We conducted mine awareness presentations in Pristina, as many children staying in the city over winter would be returning to villages where there remained a significant threat from mines and unexploded ordnance. In addition to this, we established an Information Centre for Mitrovica, where information on suspect areas was provided to organisations and communities.


Lesotho

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Malawi

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Mauritius

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Mozambique

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Namibia

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Nepal

A member of MAG staff formerly working on the Cyprus project was seconded to the UN Mission in Nepal for a period of two months in 2007 to provide technical support and advice on Explosive Ordnance Disposal and improvised explosive device (IED) disposal.

Running from April to May and based in Kathmandu, this was MAG’s first activity in the country.


Pakistan

MAG trained Pakistani non-governmental organisation Sustainable Peace And Development Organisation (SPADO) to help protect vulnerable people in conflict-affected areas from March 2010 to 2012.

In 2009, nearly half a million people fled the fighting and insecurity in South Waziristan and moved to temporary homes in the nearby Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (formerly known as North West Frontier Province).

These areas are contaminated with landmines and other remnants of conflict – the legacy of previous conflicts, as well as the recent hostilities. And displaced people are at increased risk of death or injury as, in new surroundings, they aren’t familiar with the scope and type of the contamination.

MAG worked with SPADO to deliver Risk Education to these communities.

Risk Education is a crucial way of safeguarding the wellbeing of people living, working and travelling through areas contaminated with mines and/or unexploded ordnance (UXO). It seeks to increase their awareness of the type and scope of contamination, and promote behavioural change amongst high-risk groups.

In addition to this, MAG also responded to the humanitarian situation caused by the severe flooding in July-August 2010, which saw UXO shifted downstream to DI Khan, Tank and the surrounding areas.

The Risk Education project was extended to include communities affected by the flooding that were seeking refugee in these locations. MAG also helped arrange with health NGO Global Medic for SPADO to distribute 1.5 million life-saving water purification tablets to hard-to-reach communities.


Philippines

Small Arms and Light Weapons are prevalent in the Philippines as a result of decades of internal conflict, together with clan-based society in much of the country and the inability of the Philippine government to develop a unified, transparent and accountable police and security apparatus.

MAG undertook a pilot project during June 2010, aimed at supporting an initiative led by the Philippine Office of the Presidential Advisor on the Peace Process (OPAPP), the office established by Presidential Decree to lead on peace negotiations.

Aimed at supporting the peace process and the reduction of armed violence in the Philippines, MAG’s mission centred around providing technical support on the safe, accountable and transparent destruction of weapons acquired through a Demobilisation, Disarmament and Reintegration (DDR) project led by OPAPP.

Through the provision of technical support, MAG has been able to contribute to strengthened relations with OPAPP and the Philippine military and raise the profile of Physical Security and Stockpile Management (PSSM) and the need for accountable weapons management in DDR and Security Sector Reforms (SSR) programmes in the Philippines.


Rwanda

MAG worked in Rwanda from 2008 to 2011, supporting the Rwanda Defence Force (RDF) in the destruction – and improved management – of Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW) and munitions, in order to improve the country’s security and stability.

SALW are an ongoing challenge in Rwanda, as in many other countries in the Great Lakes and Horn of Africa region. The proliferation and misuse of illicit SALW fuels violence, insecurity and instability, directly undermining development of the region.

Stockpiled munitions are stored at various RDF bases around the country, many of which are in close proximity to civilian populations. This increases the risk of illicit proliferation and the potential for civilian casualties in the event of accidental explosion.

Safety and security standards for both the storage and transportation of munitions and weapons were in urgent need of improvement; this is particularly underlined by the rise in grenade attacks throughout Rwanda1.

Although committed to SALW and munitions control, Rwandan authorities  identified a lack of financial resources and limited technical capacity as obstacles to the control and management of small arms and munitions.

Technical assistance was given to the RDF in the safe destruction of surplus weapons, ordnance and small arms ammunition, as well as stockpile management. As a result of MAG's training, the RDF is better equipped to deal with Explosive Ordnance Disposal incidents and manage stockpiles securely in the future.

Combined with the destruction of weapons and munitions, this was expected to reduce the risk of SALW-related accidents and fatalities at armouries and storage sites, as well as the risk of accidental explosion of the depots. The potential for the proliferation of illicit SALW was also lessened, as was the potential for violent crime which could have resulted from the looting of insecurely stored weapons.

More than 31,000 items of SALW and over 77 tons of surplus munitions were destroyed during the period of MAG’s operations in the country.

Notes:

1 Grenade attack kills 4 in Rwanda - police [Reuters]


Swaziland

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Tanzania

MAG commenced short term operations in Tanzania funded by UNDP in July 2010. A MAG Technical Field Manager was deployed in July to assist the Government of Tanzania in the destruction of weapons by providing training in weapons cutting and ammunition destruction to the police in north-western Tanzania.

In August 2010, 38 police personnel from two districts (Bukoba and Kigoma) were trained in weapon identification and destruction using a petrol metal cutting saw and weapon record-keeping. The same members of the police were additionally trained and tested in small arms identification and incineration. Further training was also conducted in Dar Es Salam for 12 headquarters staff to provide a theoretical overview of the regional training and increase their understanding of work in the field.


Zambia

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website


Zimbabwe

From September 2010 to June 2012, MAG helped to improve the management of firearm stockpiles and the tracing of firearms in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The project, with the Arms Management Programme of the Institute for Security Studies, saw the provision of marking and tracing equipment to the above ten countries − plus the training of police personnel in the proper use of the marking machines − with MAG providing monitoring and evaluation oversight.

The objective was to provide these Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) member states with the capacity to comply with Article 9 of the legally binding Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Control of Firearms, Ammunition and Other Related Materials (2001).

This protocol aimed to promote cooperation between states and coordinate small arms activities, aimed at curbing and preventing the illicit manufacturing of firearms, ammunition and other related materials, as well as their excessive and destabilising accumulation, trafficking, possession and use.

According to Article 9 of the SADC firearms control protocol (marking of firearms and recordkeeping):

1. State Parties undertake to establish agreed systems to ensure that all firearms are marked with a unique number, at the time of manufacture or import, on the barrel, frame and, where applicable, the slide and undertake to keep proper records of the markings.

2. The marking referred to in paragraph 1 of this Article shall identify the country of manufacture, the serial number, and the manufacturer of the firearm.

This project was funded by the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (www.state.gov/t/pm/wra/).

For more information please go to: Firearms management and tracing in Southern Africa

See also:

Small Arms Survey website

Southern African Police Chiefs Cooperation Organisation (SARPCCO) website

Southern African Development Community (SADC) website

Institute for Security Studies website






Assessments

Eritrea

Following an assessment mission to Eritrea in February 2001, MAG developed a proposal to address mine action needs in the country following the cease-fire the previous year. In conjunction with the local demining authority, an integrated proposal was developed to address the urgent need for mine action in the Temporary Security Zone.

Mauritania

MAG was invited to Mauritania by the National Bureau of Humanitarian Demining (BNDH), aa selection of military engineers formed in 1999 to cordinate and implement mine action throughout the country. As well as assessing the landmine and unexploded ordnance problem, MAG was asked by the BNDH to look at their organisation and make recommendations as to how they might operate more effectively. The report produced by MAG was presented at a North African Regional Seminar on Landmines in Tunisia and attended by governments and the United Nations.

Thailand

MAG conducted an assessment mission to Thailand in March 2001, following a request for assistance from the Thai Mine Action Centre. Following the mission the province of Chantaburi was identified as having a significant problem due to landmines and unexploded ordnance. The Level One Impact Survey indicated that approximately 10,312 hectares of land were contaminated and that in the previous two years there had been 215 accident victims in the province.

Uganda

The involvement of MAG goes back to the provision of a grant to the Uganda Campaign to Ban Landmines to discuss and develop its members' response to mine awareness needs. Following further requests for assistance a two-week assessment mission was conducted in April 2001 to gain a full understanding of the work undertaken to date. The main findings highlighted a landmine and unexploded ordnance problem in the north and west of the country.



Some killer facts

An amputee in Angola

72 states and seven other areas are confirmed or suspected to be mine-affected.
Landmine Monitor 2011

• Deadly cluster bombs contaminate at least 24 states and three other areas.
Cluster Munition Monitor 2012

740,000+ people die each year as a result of armed violence.
Global Burden of Armed Violence report, Geneva Declaration

About MAG


MAG (Mines Advisory Group) saves and improves lives by reducing the devastating effects armed violence and remnants of conflict have on people around the world.
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Co-laureate of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize  |  Registered as a charitable company in the UK  |  Company no: 4016409  Charity no: 1083008  |  ISO 9001:2008 accredited  |  International Mine Action Standards compliant  |  Signatory of the ICRC Code of Conduct  |  Member of the Fundraising Standards Board scheme  |  Registered office: Suite 3A, South Central, 11 Peter Street, Manchester, M2 5QR, United Kingdom